The Way You Walk Tells About Your Personality Traits

Your gait speaks about your personality traits.

Personality Traits

Our actions speak who we are. The small things we do every day reflect our inner world. We do some of those things unconsciously. This usually happens almost automatically without considerable effort.

For instance, nail-biting was found to be associated with stress. People who engage in this behavior is said to be experiencing stress.

Nail biting is an example of behavior that people do without noticing them sometimes. But this type of behavior conveys some psychological implication.

For instance, a new study found that someone’s gait reflects his/her personality traits.

A group of researchers investigated the relationship between walking speed and personality factors.

The finding suggests that people who are fast walkers are most likely extraverts, conscientious and open to new experiences.

The conclusion was drawn from more than fifteen thousand adult participants aged 25 to 100 years old.

The authors concluded that:

“This study provides robust evidence that walking speed in adulthood reflects, in part, the individual’s personality.”

Of course, walking speed changes as an individual gets older.

But people who are high in extraversion, conscientiousness, and openness don’t change their walking speed as they age.

Although the study was correlational, the authors confidently concluded that:

“Extraversion and conscientiousness were the most consistent personality correlates of walking speed.

Active and enthusiastic individuals and those with self-discipline and organization walked faster at follow-up and declined less in gait speed over time in the HRS.”

On the other hand, slow walking was associated with neuroticism. In fact, the authors noted:

“… slower gait is predictive of a range of deleterious outcomes, including poor mental health, higher risk of incident functional limitations and disability, impaired cognition and incident dementia, and ultimately higher mortality risk.”

Although the findings of the previous study were significant, one should remember its nature.

It does not mean that all slow walkers are neurotic, and fast walkers are extraverted, conscious, and open to new experience.

It could be possible but it’s not sufficient to hold absolute claim.

I’m a licensed psychometrician, author, and blogger. I’m currently working as a University instructor teaching psychology. I love writing and doing psychological research.

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